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BISHOP’S LETTER ON THE ORDINARIATE
AND THE RECRUITMENT/DISCERNMENT PROCESS

Bishop Peter Coffin, the Bishop Ordinary, celebrating the Eucharist.
Bishop Peter Coffin, the Bishop Ordinary, celebrating the Eucharist.

Fellow Anglicans,
If you are reading this brochure it is possible that you are already in the process of working with your loved ones and ecclesiastical family to discern a calling as a military chaplain. For some of you this is a natural progression from parish ministry, and your experience of working with military members in your home churches will give you valuable insight in how you fulfill the vital role of pastor and advisor to those whose work it is to protect this great country of ours.

Military Chaplaincy is an exciting, busy, energizing and energetic ministry of presence and sacrament. Upon enrolment in the military chaplain family, you will be trained and posted to your first military base where you will be expected to minister to, and live amongst, military members just like you. You may be expected to deploy with them to training exercises or on domestic or overseas operations. Some of you may find yourselves at sea with the Canadian Fleet. Some of you will find yourselves overseeing the worship and care of military families as chapel life coordinators of the military chapels.

You can expect to be posted every few years, you will be challenged physically and at times, spiritually, and you will find that there are things for which seminary simply never prepared you. All these things will be experienced from within a team that will support you, cheer you on, and form family to you in a way that is unique to military service. As you reach certain milestones in your service, you will also be given opportunities for professional development and further education, including post graduate studies.

As citizens of Canada, and priests in the Anglican Church of Canada with a Baccalaureate, an M.Div, and 2 years of diocesan ministry, you are able to apply for consideration to both the Regular and Reserve Force as military chaplains called to serve military members at home and on operations. As postulants of a diocese, you also have the opportunity to apply for programs which can help you to complete your university degree, and, in some cases, will result in your enrolment in the Regular or Reserve Force as a Military Chaplain in training following ordination. Either way, the first step is to speak to your Diocesan Bishop, and then to contact the Chaplain Recruiter or the Recruiter at the Office of the Chaplain General. We look forward to hearing from you, and will be pleased to work with you and your Diocesan Bishop as you consider this call.

The Right Reverend Peter Coffin
Anglican Bishop Ordinary to the CAF

Colonel, the Venerable Nigel Shaw
Archdeacon to the Military Ordinariate

CONTACT INFO FOR
THE CANON RECRUITER:
LCol the Rev. Canon Michelle Staples
[email protected]
613 971 7576

Recruiting at the Office of the
Chaplain General:
613 943 7015

Bishop and Staples

Please feel free to download this PDF Brochure containing Recruitment Information.

PADRE JENNIFER GOSSE
MINISTRY AMONG RECRUITS

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“The Canadian Armed Forces trains all its new personnel at the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School (CFLRS) in St-Jean, QC. There are few places where a chaplain is more appreciated than in that context and that makes CFLRS a phenomenal place to do ministry.”

PADRE STEELE LAZERTE
DEPLOYED MINISTRY

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“I must admit that when I applied to seminary back in 1995 that the variety of professional experiences and opportunities I have been able to participate in, both in my civilian ministry and my ministry within the Canadian Armed Forces, have far exceeded anything I could have ever asked or imagined.”

PADRE JEANNINE FRIESEN
CHAPLAINCY WITH
THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY

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“A good portion of the Chaplain’s day at sea involves visiting sailors in the spaces in which they work. The Padre can go almost anywhere on the ship in order to be with the men and women where they are employed. This is an extremely privileged position and it provides wonderful opportunity to get to meet the crew on their turf, and to exercise what chaplains refer to as a ministry of presence.”
PADRE SHAUN TURNER –CHAPLAINCY WITH THE
DISASTER ASSISTANCE RESPONSE TEAM (DART)

Padre Shaun Turner welcomes patients to a mobile medical clinic in Tom Gato, north of Jacmel, Haiti.
Padre Shaun Turner welcomes patients to a mobile medical clinic in Tom Gato, north of Jacmel, Haiti.

“Helping medical teams as a spare set of hands, providing pastoral care to Canadian’s waiting at the embassy for evac, walking alongside search and rescue personnel, liaising with local religious leaders and NGOs, accompanying Army personnel on rescue missions, and much more; all the while keeping the mission of Moral, Ethical and Spiritual support to the troops as the priority. This is Chaplaincy to the Canadian Forces. The convergence of physical challenge, emotional stress, vocational ministry and God’s Grace create, for me, an amazing experience of constant ministry and growth. There is no life like it.”

 

PADRE GORDON MINTZ
HEAVENLY WORK:
HANGAR LINE CHAPLAINCY

Padre Mintz in the spotter seat in the Herc
Padre Mintz in the spotter seat in the Herc

“Most days I felt like a little kid going to work and getting to fly in the Hercules (CC-130H) or Gonzo (CT-142 Dash-8) aircraft with the crews as they continued their training or executed their missions. It was a lot of fun to see parts of Canada, the US and Europe out of the portal window of the Hercules aircraft, especially when refuelling trailing F18s. More importantly these flights facilitated my ministry of presence. You can have amazing conversations in the back of an aircraft on a long flight to resupply CFS Alert in the high Arctic or training over the desert in Southern California.”