A journey just begun: Contributions from the Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island celebrated

In celebration of 300 years of continuous Anglican presence and worship in the Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, members of General Synod 2010 were treated to a magnificent worship service at Exhibition Grounds in Halifax, Nova Scotia on June 6.

A drama team tells the story of some of the challenges and struggles faced by Nova Scotia's first Bishop Charles Inglis during a special worship service on Sunday, June 6 to celebrate 300 years of continuous Anglican presence and worship in the Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.  TRINA GALLOP/GENERAL SYNOD COMMUNICATIONS

A drama team tells the story of some of the challenges and struggles faced by Nova Scotia’s first Bishop Charles Inglis during a special worship service on Sunday, June 6 to celebrate 300 years of continuous Anglican presence and worship in the Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. TRINA GALLOP/GENERAL SYNOD COMMUNICATIONS

Titled, “A Journey Just Begin”, the service of thanksgiving and celebration featured highlights of the events that have shaped and formed the diocese. A drama team presented a series of vignettes depicting the struggles of Nova Scotia’s first Bishop Charles Inglis, how the Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund was born in the region following the 1959 Springhill Mine Disaster, and the challenges to those seeking the ordination of women within the diocese.

Diocesan Bishop Sue Moxley presided at the service and Archbishop Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, preached. The large arena accommodated the nearly 2000 people in attendance at the celebration.

“Strong has been the witness of the Church in these parts; and significant the contribution of this diocese – its bishops, clergy and laity to the life and work of the Anglican Church of Canada – at home and throughout the world,” said Archbishop Hiltz in his sermon.

Comparing the ministry of those in the diocese to the readings chosen for the tricentenary, Archbishop Hiltz said the text, “evoke images of a people called to holiness of life; a people called to be one in Christ; a people called to be on the move.”

Archbishop Hiltz referred to the Five Marks of Mission widely accepted throughout the worldwide communion, along with a sixth Mark of Mission proposed by Canadian Anglicans and said, “we are a marked people – called to be on the move – celebrating the gospel, sharing the faith, doing works of mercy, advancing justice and peace among all people, caring for the earth.”

Referring back to the celebration theme, “A Journey Just Begin”, Archbishop Hiltz encouraged the diocese to take the first steps into the next century of continuing Anglican presence, worship and service in the region, hearing the words of the text, ensuring, “our hearts be set on God”, “nurtured by fellowship, one with another in Christ,” and in Jesus’ words, going to the world, “as the ones I send for I am with you ‘til the age shall end.”

Over 350 delegates and special guests have come from coast to coast to coast across Canada for this nine-day event, which takes place each triennium. Further details and highlights are available online at www.anglican.ca.

------------------------------

Interested in keeping up-to-date on news and information from the Anglican Church of Canada? Sign up for our email alerts and get our stories delivered right to your inbox.