National Housing Day 2016: A call to prayer

November 16, 2016 Dear friends in Christ, In the spirit of the 2013 Joint Assembly Declaration, we call on members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC) and the Anglican Church of Canada (ACoC) to pray for safe, affordable and adequate housing for all on November 22, National Housing Day. Adequate housing is essential … Continued

Pray for Aleppo

“I am praying, in fact I am screaming at God to send his holy angels to protect the city. I rail at Him to please intervene”[1]. So read an urgent appeal for prayer for the people of Aleppo, which I received yesterday. How timely as the Church keeps the Feast of St. Michael and All … Continued

Stand with Standing Rock—A Call for Prayer from the Office of the National Indigenous Anglican Bishop and the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada

Water is sacred and one of the four primal elements that sustain life on Mother Earth. We have not respected water and consequently many lakes, streams, rivers and creeks are polluted. It is an element on the verge of scarcity. We must protect water. There is a pipeline approved for construction in the United States … Continued

“Forbearing one another in love”

In light of decisions made at General Synod 2016 concerning the solemnizing of same-sex marriage, I pray our Church can and will take to heart Paul’s plea with the Christians living in Ephesus, “I beg you to lead a life worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all lowliness and meekness, … Continued

Archbishop Fred Hiltz: Sermon from the Opening Eucharist of the 41st Session of The General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada

Imagine with me for just a few minutes that tiny little community that was the infant Church—Peter and John and James and Andrew and Philip and Thomas and Bartholomew and Matthew and James son of Alphaeus and Simon the zealot, and Judas son of James together with certain women including Mary the mother of Jesus, … Continued

A message from the Archbishop Fred Hiltz

Earlier this week in Pikangikum, nine people, all members of one family, died in a house fire. It is impossible to know all the things that make up this tragedy, but we know that it took place in cramped and inadequate housing that is particularly vulnerable to fire, we know that fire suppression services in Indigenous communities are often inadequate, lacking the resources they need to carry out their life-saving work. We know that 90% of the homes do not have running water.