February 22 is Human Trafficking Awareness Day—a day set aside by Canadians to bring particular attention to the issues of human trafficking and modern slavery in Canada and around the world. On this date in 2007, the Parliament of Canada voted unanimously to develop and implement a national anti-trafficking action plan.

This year, the Anglican Church of Canada designates February 21, 2021, as Freedom Sunday, an opportunity to learn about human trafficking and slavery in Canada today. While our observance of this day typically takes place near February 22 (Human Trafficking Awareness Day), study and liturgical resources can be adjusted for other days throughout the year, such as Sundays near:

  • June 21, National Indigenous Peoples Day
  • July 30, UN World Day Against Trafficking in Persons
  • December 10, UN Human Rights Day

Freedom Sunday is a global movement of prayer, worship and action to address the crime of human trafficking. In particular, Freedom Sunday shines light on: the connections between human trafficking, labour exploitation, missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls; the day also raises awareness for the persistent, deliberate human rights violations and violent abuses against Indigenous Peoples. Globally, faith communities learn about human trafficking in their neighbourhoods and beyond; express compassion and solidarity with trafficked peoples through prayer, bible study and worship; and, make commitments to act.

How you can help

  1. Download the liturgical resources available to participate in Freedom Sunday on February 21 (or choose an alternate date—suggestions above).
  2. Raise awareness in your church about Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Pay particular attention to the Calls for Justice to address the trafficking and exploitation of Indigenous women and girls (Theme 14, pages 127-131).
  3. Listen to the Anglican Church of Canada’s Sacred Teachings Podcast episode on “Stolen Peoples”.
  4. Learn more about human trafficking and modern slavery in Canada and globally, and how the church works with partners to address these issues.
  5. Talk within your community and beyond, about the ways your church: supports victims; accompanies survivors; and, builds resilience for eradicating the trafficking and exploitation of Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA peoples.
  6. Sign up below to receive occasional updates by email for ways you and your congregation can help in the fight against human trafficking and modern slavery.

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