Initially we had an FAQ entitled “Only Anglican Church in the World Dedicated in Memory of a Layman”. This FAQ was derived from information supplied from the web site of the Anglican Church of St. Saviour “(The Brock Memorial Church”) in Queenston, Ontario, in the Diocese of Niagara. Their website says:

“Our little stone church is a special sanctuary within the world-wide Anglican Communion, being the only church in the world dedicated in memory of a layman, Major-General Sir Isaac Brock, commander of the British forces during the War of 1812, who was mortally wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights, lies buried under the monument bearing his name”.

Since that FAQ was posted we have heard from other Anglicans informing us of additional churches dedicated to lay persons. Also within Canada, in the Diocese of Huron there is the Trivett Memorial Anglican Church in Exeter, Ontario. This large church was built by devout local businessman, Thomas Trivett (1813-1894).

Another Anglican, with excellent web searching skills informed us of at least three others in the Episcopal Church alone. One of these is a dedication in memory of a lay woman and one is dedicated to another (different) general.

Palmer Memorial Church (formerly Edward Albert Memorial Chapel) – Houston, Texas

The Chapel was donated by its foundress in memory of her brother who drowned while attempting to save her.

Thankful Memorial Episcopal Church – Chattanooga, Tennessee

The Church was dedicated in memory of Thankful Johnson, widow of the parish’s founder.

Robert E. Lee Memorial Church – Lexington Virginia.

The Church was dedicated in memory of the general who led the Confederate forces in the American Civil War.

While the number of Anglican churches dedicated to lay persons is admittedly very small, there are some and I’m sure many more in churches outside North America. My thanks for this additional information which I am pleased to post for others who may also be interested.

Still curious? If you have further questions, feel free to reach out to us. Why not Ask an Anglican?